Happy Holidays: Preservation PARTY!!

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2013 Holiday Membership Event

Thursday, December 12, 5:00-7:00PM

Hill House Bed & Breakfast

120 Hillside Street, Asheville

As an annual tradition, the members and guests of the Preservation Society gather together to socialize, discuss events of the past year and drum up ideas for the year to come.  True to our cause, we search for significant historic architecture to host this fun event and this year is no exception!

Hill House is a highly-reviewed and award-winning, 17-year-old bed and breakfast one mile from the center of downtown Asheville. It was originally built as the family residence of furniture manufacturer James Hill in 1885. The beautiful home with the wraparound front porch between the Montford neighborhood and the Grove Park Inn is a pastiche of Queen Anne and Victorian elements common to the period.  For many years in the 20th century, Hill House was divided into apartment units. In 1995, Carol Ann Winter and Albert Ganzenhuber opened the property as Hill House Bed & Breakfast, following a lengthy renovation. Bill and Terry Erickson took over in 2003, and in February 2012, David Raphael Smith became the inn’s third (and current) owner.

Parking:  There is ample parking on nearby Mt. Claire Avenue (map) as well as Community Family Practice (map) on the corner of Merrimon Avenue and Hillside Street.  Limited parking is available for those with disabilities and limited mobility onsite, behind Hill House, follow the driveway.

Santahat

 

Historic Black Mountain College Campus Tour

bmcmac_bmcwc40_001 work camp

In 1941, Black Mountain College moved across the valley from its first location at the YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly to its own campus at Lake Eden where it remained until its closing in 1956. Join PSABC for a tour of this second campus and the unique architecture that remains as a testament to this creative form of education.

Where: 375 Lake Eden Road, Black Mountain, directions below

When: This Saturday, October 5 at 10AM

BMC BACKGROUND:

Founded in 1933 by John Andews Rice, Theodore Driere and other faculty of Rollins College in reaction to passive educational norms, it combined rigorous and collaborative liberal education in arts, crafts and architecture with communal living on a site originally developed by E.W. Grove as a resort. The school’s board included Albert Einstein and attracted participants such as Willem deKooning, Joseph and Anni Albers, John Cage and Buckminster Fuller, creator of the first geodesic dome. The school was well known in Europe while little known at home and was a haven of creativity. It is located 3 miles from Black Mountain on the Rockmont Camp campus. Join us for a walking tour of the campus, and the art and historic buildings of the era.

DIRECTIONS:

Take I-40 to Exit 59 and turn north. At light, turn right on US 70 and proceed to next light. Turn left and cross bridge. At stop sign, turn right on Old US 70. Proceed to Lake Eden Road, watching for tall security fencing upon approach. Turn left on Lake Eden Road and proceed 1.5 miles to Camp Rockmont. IMPORTANT: Take second entrance to camp and proceed to BMC Studies Building.
Scan this code to download map to your phone:

Preservation Society to Sell City Landmark

Front Facade, WestThe Preservation Society of Asheville & Buncombe County announces today that the 1869 Camp Patton-Parker House enters the market for sale.  This local historic landmark, owned and occupied by seven generations of the same family, has reached a turning point in its future.

“That future will be secure”, noted Preservation Society Executive Director Jack Thomson.  “When the historic house is sold we will place preservation covenants in the deed that will protect the historic nature of this special place in perpetuity.”

Camp Patton, built in 1868-69 by Thomas Patton after returning home from the Civil War, had previously served as a military encampment for both the Union and Confederate military.  Patton employed African American carpenters to help him in the construction of the house.  The grandson of early Asheville settler James Patton, Thomas Patton later became mayor.

In November of 1894 a group of civic-minded ladies met at the home of Mayor Patton at 95 Charlottes Street to organize support for votes for women.  The next day at a large gathering at the Buncombe County Court House sponsored by Mayor Patton, the North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association was formed and the fight for women’s right to vote was launched in North Carolina.

The 145 year old frame house is formally organized around central and transverse hallways.  A grand entryway of transom and sidelights greets visitors as they enter a center hallway flanked by a formal parlor & dining room and an arched opening leading to a grand stairway. The later additions for a growing family now boast six bedrooms, 4.5 baths and 8 fireplaces.  Romantically sited on 1.23 acres, the Patton Parker House remains as the last of the large open landscapes so close to the City center.

Camp Patton was entered in to the National Register of Historic Places on August 9th, 1982 and became a City of Asheville Local Landmark on March 28, 2000.  “While the national and local designations help with the recognition of this important historic place, they can only delay what may be extreme development pressures in the near future,” Thomson said.  “By privately restricting the house and land, the Preservation Society can ensure a safe future for the Patton Parker House.  This is an important site for Asheville and for the Chestnut Hill neighborhood, which is also a National Register of Historic Places District.  We believe our work helps protect neighborhoods as well as our history and heritage.”

To schedule a viewing of the house, please contact the Preservation Society offices at 828-254-2343.

Rustic Revival & Motor Courts: 4/20/13

Courtesy Elizabeth Read, Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy Elizabeth Read, Wikimedia Commons

History, Music, Food & Fun!

Saturday, April 20, 2013, 11am – 2pm
Log Cabin Motor Court &
The Pines Cabins & Cottages
330 Weaverville Highway, Woodfin, NC

Map

Join the Preservation Society for a tour of two historic roadside motor courts, The Pines Cabins & Cottages and the Log Cabin Motor Courts.  These two destinations sprung up at the same time in a competition to completion.  Learn which won (by only three days!), view an in-depth presentation of Motor Courts in Asheville by noted architectural historian Clay Griffith, tour the sites, sit a spell and enjoy old time music by local band, THE TATER DIGGERS.  Our hosts have generously provided a 10% lunch discount at the attached Bavarian Dining Restaurant.  Bring comfortable shoes, your guest and perhaps a lawn chair!

Preservation Society to Sell City Landmark

Front Facade, West

EMAIL pattonparkerhouse@gmail.com to set up an appointment

 

The Preservation Society of Asheville & Buncombe County announces today that the 1869 Camp Patton-Parker House enters the market for sale.  This local historic landmark, owned and occupied by seven generations of the same family, has reached a turning point in its future.

“That future will be secure”, noted Preservation Society Executive Director Jack Thomson.  “When the historic house is sold we will place preservation covenants in the deed that will protect the historic nature of this special place in perpetuity.”

Camp Patton, built in 1868-69 by Thomas Patton after returning home from the Civil War, had previously served as a military encampment for both the Union and Confederate military.  Patton employed African American carpenters to help him in the construction of the house.  The grandson of early Asheville settler James Patton, Thomas Patton later became mayor.

In November of 1894 a group of civic-minded ladies met at the home of Mayor Patton at 95 Charlottes Street to organize support for votes for women.  The next day at a large gathering at the Buncombe County Court House sponsored by Mayor Patton, the North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association was formed and the fight for women’s right to vote was launched in North Carolina.

The 145 year old frame house is formally organized around central and transverse hallways.  A grand entryway of transom and sidelights greets visitors as they enter a center hallway flanked by a formal parlor & dining room and an arched opening leading to a grand stairway. The later additions for a growing family now boast six bedrooms, 4.5 baths and 8 fireplaces.  Romantically sited on 1.23 acres, the Patton Parker House remains as the last of the large open landscapes so close to the City center.

Camp Patton was entered in to the National Register of Historic Places on August 9th, 1982 and became a City of Asheville Local Landmark on March 28, 2000.  “While the national and local designations help with the recognition of this important historic place, they can only delay what may be extreme development pressures in the near future,” Thomson said.  “By privately restricting the house and land, the Preservation Society can ensure a safe future for the Patton Parker House.  This is an important site for Asheville and for the Chestnut Hill neighborhood, which is also a National Register of Historic Places District.  We believe our work helps protect neighborhoods as well as our history and heritage.”

To schedule a viewing of the house, please contact the Preservation Society offices at 828-254-2343.

New Board Member, Dale Slusser

The Preservation Society is proud to announce the election of Mr. Dale Slusser to the Board of Trustees.  Dale has an interesting history and brings a great set of skills to the governance of your non-profit preservation organization.  Please read Dale’s bio below to gain an insight to our newest Trustee.

Mr. Dale Slusser, newest PSABC Board Trustee

“At the age of six years old, my father died, leaving my mother to care for six children. A year later (1966) I, along with my twin brother, was enrolled in Milton Hershey School, Hershey, PA.   The school which now serves the needs of disadvantaged boys and girls was during my enrollment, a school for orphan boys. At the school, the boys lived in student homes under the care of houseparents who took on the role of parents to the boys.  I credit loving houseparents for showing to me the love of God by living out their Christian faith in care and concern for me and the other boys.  After MHS, I obtained a B.S. in Education degree (Library Science) from Millersville University in 1981 and an Associates in Arts degree from Harrisburg Area Community College in 1984.

I have had an interest in history and historical architecture ever since I was in junior high school. I fondly remember the field trips to the Ephrata Cloisters, the Landis Valley Farm Museum, the Moravian settlement at Lititz, and the Gettysburg and Antietam battlegrounds.  As freshmen in high school, my brother and I were transferred to student-home “Bonniemead”, which was a former 1860 “mansion”, complete with a spiral stairway and Greek-revival entrance doorway with its etched ruby-glass sidelights and transom. My interest in architecture and history continued in college, as I minored in History and did extensive historical research and writing both on “Bonniemead” and other historic homes, such as the early-eighteenth-century Germanic Abraham Herr House in Millersville, PA.  While in college I joined the Marietta Restoration Associates in Marietta, Pa.

After graduation from Millersville University, I was asked by Margaret Hunt Landis, President of the Marietta Restoration Associates, to volunteer to prepare the National Register nomination for an extension to Marietta’s Historic District.  After a year’s work and a visit from SHPO officials, it was decided to increase the Extension to include almost the entire western section of the town. In the end, the Extension included 291 structures, thereby increasing Marietta’s Historic District to include over 48% of the town.  During this period I was also pursuing an Associates Degree in Architectural Technology.

While I was pursuing my Architectural Technology degree, I was hired part-time by Levengood Associates, Architects in downtown Lancaster, PA to research, draw and prepare the National Register nomination for the 1798 John Bishop House in Berks County, PA.  Richard Levengood had purchased the home and subsequently restored it for his personal use.  After graduation I was hired fulltime as an architectural draftsman with Levengood Associates and later Calabrese Architects in Strasburg, PA. At both firms, I was involved in many rehab and restoration projects on historic structures.

In 1987, Dale moved to Georgia to work with Helps International Ministries, a non-profit mission agency providing practical “helps” in the areas of architectural design to other Christian missions and ministries. I moved to Asheville in 1993 when Helps International moved their offices here from Georgia  It was shortly after moving to Asheville, that I  read in a biography of famed Victorian author George MacDonald, that his son Ronald had lived here in Asheville in the late 1880’s  and was the  headmaster of a local boarding school, named Ravenscroft.   A brief mention in the biography of the death of Ronald’s wife, who was an artist and student of John Ruskin, sent me on a quest to find out more about Ronald’s story, and about the Ravenscroft School.  My fifteen-year research culminated in the publication in 2009 of In the Near Loss of Everything: George MacDonald’s Son in America.  I am currently finishing a subsequent book, which is a comprehensive history of the Ravenscroft School and Associate Mission which operated from 1854-1920.

I joined the PSABC four years ago, and in 2009 helped research the history of the Grove Park Office.

I live with my wife Susan in a late 1920’s bungalow in “Linwood Park”, a small subdivision between Oakley and Biltmore Village, developed in 1922 by Lynwood B. Jackson.”

Thomas Wolfe Cabin Survey

Happiest wishes for the New Year! 

As our first call to action for 2012, we would like to invite you to participate in a brief survey regarding your opinions concerning the significance of the Thomas Wolfe cabin in Oteen.

The survey contains only a few questions and will take less than five minutes to complete.  Your responses are confidential and will help us determine the interest in preserving this important historical structure. 

NOTE: The survey is limited to the first 100 responses.

As you may know, in the summer of 1937 Thomas Wolfe retreated to a modest cabin in Oteen, East Asheville, to avoid both the fame and infamy his writing had created. His stay at the rustic revival cabin was brief yet productive. The City of Asheville now owns the cabin, which is a local historic landmark, yet the structure has fallen into a severe state of disrepair. The Preservation Society of Asheville & Buncombe County plans to move forward to produce a privately funded structural assessment and feasibility study, which will lay the foundation for the restoration and future use of the site.

Click on the attached link to provide your survey responses and help in this study: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/58X336S

Thank you so much for your time and help in this important preservation effort.